Tree insights

This post will be an interest to those are studying or are interested in steadying the Ogham.

Druid Life

If you’re a Druid studying the ogham, but you don’t live alongside all of the trees, it’s difficult making a connection with them. In theory, the solution is to swap in a tree local to you that has the same qualities – but without knowing the original tree, this is not an easy call to make.

The Woodland Trust, a UK charity, have done a thing I think Druids are going to find useful and inspiring. They’ve made a collection of small videos each capturing a year in the life of a tree. These are beautiful pieces, well worth watching for their innate loveliness. They also give a real sense of a tree in a landscape and its life through the seasons.

Here’s my absolute favourite, the beech,

And if you go to the The Woodland Trust channel on youtube, you can work your way through many others. Here are…

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What the Irish Ate Before Potatoes

NOTE: Thank you to Bon Appétit for the article!

 

What the Irish Ate Before Potatoes

How the Welsh developed their own form of poetry

NOTE: Thank you to The Conversation website for the article!

 

 

How the Welsh developed their own form of poetry

Granny Women: Appalachia’s Original Medical Professionals

NOTE: Thank you to Appalachian Magazine for the article!

 

Granny Women: Appalachia’s Original Medical Professionals

Some fairy tales may be 6000 years old

NOTE: Thank you to Science Magazine for the article!

 

Some fairy tales may be 6000 years old

Creativity and risk

An interesting post worth the read. It is a post about creativity, risk and it is as every bit inflective as it is reflective of the author.

Druid Life

There can be no real creativity without taking risks. Of course, there are a lot of good things a person can do who doesn’t want to take risks as well. Study, practice, developing skills, learning about relevant things – this doesn’t have to feel risky not least because we never have to share it.

There is a school of thought that says we should create purely for ourselves, driven by our own passion and inspiration and to hell with what anyone else thinks. Many creators we now think of as great were not valued in their own lifetimes. There’s another school of thought that says a piece is not complete until it has an audience and that the audience is co-creator of the finished work. Without someone to interact with a piece, an important part is missing. This is more how I feel about things.

When we set out to…

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