Meet the Modern-Day Pagans Who Celebrate the Ancient Gods

NOTE: Thank you to Narratively for the article!

 

Meet the Modern-Day Pagans Who Celebrate the Ancient Gods

NOTE: Thanks to The Heritage Council and HeritageMaps.ie for the article!

 

The Heritage Council and HeritageMaps.ie are pleased to announce the release of their latest dataset mapping Ireland’s mysterious Sheela-na-Gigs.

Launch of Sheela-na-Gigs Map

Update April 21, 2017

Among some of the more practical tracts of text pertaining to Druidry and Paganism, I have been adding some  quotes and poetry and a few meditations and chants and prayers to my Crane Book of Wisdom.

Among them are “The Peace of Wild Things” by Wendell Berry, “Nature Meditation on Amergin”, “I Have” a Navajo chant, “Earth Teach Me” an Ute prayer.

Some more: “Calling My Name” by Jim Beer, “The Task of a Poet” by Dejan Stojanovic, “Do Not Stand At My Grave And Weep” by Mary Elizabeth Frye, “Advice From A Tree” by Ilan Shamir, “The Druid Vow of Friendship” which I found on Pinterest.

Some more good stuff: “The Dream of Now” by William Stafford, “Stopping by Woods On a Snowy Evening” and “The Road Not Taken”by Robert Frost,, and “An English Wood” by Robert Graves, Brehon Law and Trees, “Do not be dismayed” by L.R. Knost, “Let Earth be healed”, and another chant called simply The Awen chant.

The Downside Of “Come As You Are” Religion

For all of you who are new to Druidry or Paganism, this is a good read….

Ana's Waters

(I wrote this article as a response to Conor Davis’ request for more article geared toward a young Pagan audience, hence the relative lack of ADF-specific language.)

When facing many of life’s great dilemmas, my mind turns to the issues of Mad Magazine I read during my tween years. I still remember many of them vividly, and I can see how the writing affected my own sense of humor and writing, noticeable still.

I’d thought that the “come as you are” party was a fad limited to the 1970s, but a Google search says that there was a 1954 episode of “Ozzie and Harriet” with the title, and apparently some people still do them, but I learned about them in the ‘70s and never heard of them again, so in my own head, a ‘70s thing it remains. The host calls guests up and tells them that a party…

View original post 1,609 more words

Holding Fire

A good read for those wanting to do a fire ritual, fire safety and that while fire can be fearful, it MUST be RESPECTED also.

EarthSpirit Voices

by Sarah Lyn

Last May, I stood in a field during a large community ritual, swathed from head to toe in gloves and sunglasses and hat and veil. I was fully protected from the sun. I was standing in the field. That was a feat for me.

Just six months earlier I had been in a freak accident. I had been on fire. I almost died. I almost lost my legs. I was in a coma. I woke up. I have fought every day since for my strides back towards independence.

Strands of a web were rolled out, followed by calls for those who would hold specific energies for the community, both in ritual and in the world-at-large after. These people were invited to come and hold the end of a strand.

They called for those who would hold Fire for the community. I was the most surprised when…

View original post 602 more words

It’s been 50 years. And what have Pagans accomplished?

A look back at the past… and the present.

The Allergic Pagan

Happy Birthday Paganism!

Contemporary Paganism, as it exists today, began with the Counterculture movement of the 1960s and 1970s. Religious studies scholar, Sarah Pike dates the origins of contemporary Paganism to 1967, the year that Frederick Adams incorporated Feraferia and the New Reformed Order of the Golden Dawn was founded. That same year, the Church of All Worlds filed for incorporation as a the first Pagan “church”.

Which means that this year, 2017, is the 50th anniversary of contemporary Paganism! So let’s look back at what we have accomplished over the past five decades.

View original post 1,434 more words

Haiti Doesn’t Have a Vodou Problem, It Has a Christianity Problem

NOTE: Thank you to Ebony.com for the post!

 

Haiti Doesn’t Have a Vodou Problem, It Has a Christianity Problem